Traditional Works

Non-glazed ceramic art ; That nature was tailored.

In traditional Japanese non-glazed ceramic art, the creator – the potter -- is required to follow the dictation of the material; "a-creation," so to speak. The potter's work becomes metaphysical, when s/he faces the material as embodying other-ness rather than regards it as material to be processed. Facing the material as the other is observed in traditional Japanese craftwork in general. This attitude is based on the understanding that each and every earthly existence owns its own soul which can be beyond their understanding. This attitude is observed in original Shinto, which emphasis respect for the other-ness of the world. Simple spirit, but with diversity.


Bizen-style Whide -mouthed Bulbous Vase

" Bizen-style Wide-mouthed Bulbous Vase "

(w)25.0 - (d)25.0 - (h)31.0 cm

Stoneware with natural wood ash, sesame seed fired decoration, Bizen traditional way fired to 1300 degrees C. oxidation, eight day firing, Collection of The British Museum (U.K.), 1996. Included in Amedeo Salamoni, Foreword by Jack Troy, Wood-Fired Ceramics: 100 Contemporary Artists, pp.90-91, Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., 4880 Lower Vallery Road, Atglen, PA 19310, U.S.A., 2014.

Faceted Jar with Lid

" Faceted Jar with Lid "

(w)21.0 - (d)21.0 - (h)33.5 cm

Wheel-thrown and altered stoneware with natural wood ash, Bizen traditional way fired to 1300 degrees C. oxidation, eight-day firing. Exhibited at the " Edge to Edge ",  Victorian Ceramic Group, Kidogo Arthouse, Bathers Beach Fremantle, Australia, June 27 - July 11, 1999.

Side-fired Jar and Bottle

" Side-fired Jar and Bottle "

(w)38.0 - (d)16.5 - (h)18.5 cm

Natural glaze with firemarks evidence of where each pot rested on another during firing, traditional way fired to 1280 degrees C. reduction, eight-day firing. Exhibited at the 2nd International Ceramic Triennial UNICUM, European Cultural and Technological Center Maribor (EKTC), Manor Betnava, Slovenia, May 15 - September 30, 2012.

Bowls in Sets of Five

" Bowls in Sets of Five "

Smallest (w)17.7 - (d)17.7 - (h)5.5 cm, largest (w)31.3 - (d)31.3 - (h)8.5 cm

Wheel-thrown and stoneware, with salt-water sprayed interior, black slip exterior, bottom upward when stacking kiln, traditional way fired to1250 degrees C. oxidation. Included in 500 Bowls: Contemporary Explorations of a Timeless Design, Lark Books, A Division of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc.,New York, U.S.A., 2003.


v&a_mizusashi

" Bizen-style Faceted Mizu-sashi "

19.5 centimeters in height

Wood-fired stoneware with natural wood ash, fire change, traditional way fired to 1280 degrees C., eight-day firing. Exhibited at " Makoto Hatori ", Leigh Gallery, London, 15-27 June, 1993. Collection of the Victria & Albert Museum (U.K.), 1993.


yohen_vases_2

" Bizen-style Side-fired Teabowl "

(w)15.5 - (d)12.9 - (h)9.2 cm

Wheel-thrown and stoneware, with natural wood ash glaze showing blue glass " fingers" and " dragonfly eye," Bizen traditional way fired to1280 degrees C. reduction, ten-day firing. Included in 500 Bowls: Contemporary Explorations of a Timeless Design, Lark Books, A Division of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc.,New York, U.S.A., 2003.

Teabowls : originally for daily use, from the functional point of view their history dates back to the woodenware known as "goki." Certain kinds of daily tableware made from fired clay, such as ricebowls, gained a special status through their use in the soulful culture nurtured by the Way of Tea. The avant-garde perspective enabled these handy bowls to make a universal debut. Masters of the tea ceremony, as artists, provided an artistic perspective without creating actual pieces. This is analogous to the role Marcel Duchamp played when he provided the potential for new points of view by displaying a urinal in an exhibition and proposing the concept of "ready-made" by using bicycle wheels and a stool.





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